Vintage Computer Games, Missing Aircraft, and an Amazing Forensic Resource: An Interview with Douglas White of the National Institute of Science and Technology’s National Software Reference Library (NSRL)

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What do vintage computer games have to do with missing aircraft? Enter the amazing world of the National Software Reference Library, thanks to our guide, Douglas White!

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BIO:

Douglas White leads the National Software Reference Library project for the National Institute of Standards and Technology.  He has 25 years of experience with distributed systems, distributed databases and telecommunication protocols, real time biomonitoring, real time videoprocessing, system administration and network monitoring. He holds both a B.A and M.S. in computer science from Hood College. He has given lectures for the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, the High Technology Crime Investigation Association, the Digital Forensic Research Workshop and other digital forensic conferences.

 

 

LINKS:
https://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2016/09/digital-forensics-rescues-retro-video-games-and-software

www.nsrl.nist.gov – NSRL website

www.nist.gov/forensics – NIST Forensics topics

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/outreach/tops/white/white.html – Video lecture on the Cabrinety-NSRL effort

https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2012/05/life-saving-the-national-software-reference-library/ – interview that includes the FDA story

https://Howtheygotgame.stanford.edu – Blogs by SUL staff including Henry Lowood and Charlotte Thai

 

CAR CRASHES AND “CRIME HOT SPOTS” — STUDYING PATTERNS TO PREVENT CRIME

Planning & Research Manager

Greg Collins

Can police use statistics about traffic problems to develop methods of lowering crime rates in a given area? Listen to the authors of a fascinating study on this topic, and learn more about the Smart Policing Initiative.

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ABOUT OUR GUESTS

Greg Collins is the Research and Analysis Manager for the Shawnee, KS Police Department. He is primarily responsible for CALEA accreditation, policy review and updating, grant management, overseeing the Crime Analysis function, and managing police department volunteers.

Greg joined the Shawnee Police Department as a sworn officer in 1991. In addition to road patrol duties, Greg has worked as a D.A.R.E. officer, detective, patrol sergeant, training sergeant, and traffic safety unit supervisor. Greg has also been a member of the department’s Special Tactics and Response team, and a field training officer. Greg transitioned to his current civilian position in June 2008.

Greg holds a B.A. in Management and Human Relations from MidAmerica Nazarene University and is an IACP Associate member.

Dr. Kevin M Bryant is a professor and chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Benedictine College in Atchinson, Kansas. Bryant completed training and was certified in advanced crime mapping by the National Institute of Justice.

LINKS:

Hot Spots Policing https://www.crimesolutions.gov/PracticeDetails.aspx?ID=8

Smart Policing Initiative http://www.smartpolicinginitiative.com/

NIJ Overview of Program Profile: Data-Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS) in Kansas
https://www.crimesolutions.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?ID=479&utm_source=Eblast-GovDelivery&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=LawEnforcement&utm_content=CSprog479-07112016&utm_campaign=CSreleases

National Institute of Justice http://www.nij.gov

 

NamUs: Naming The Unidentified, Finding The Missing – An Interview With J. Todd Matthews

 

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We loved talking to Todd Matthews last year, but there was much more to learn, so we invited him back for some important updates on the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, also known as NamUs.

Todd is the Director of Case Management and Communications for NamUs. He  joined the NamUs management team in 2011 as the program transitioned to the UNT Health Science Center. In his current role, he manages the NamUs Regional System Administrator staff, oversees quality assurance and quality control of NamUs data, performs outreach and training, coordinates all NamUs print and broadcast media, and serves as the media spokesperson for NamUs.

Todd Matthews previously served as a NamUs Regional System Administrator and was a member of the NamUs Advisory Board for the development of the NamUs database and program. In those roles, he piloted efforts to coordinate data exchanges between NamUs and the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

He has also served as the Media Director for two important volunteer programs related to missing and unidentified persons: The Doe Network and Project EDAN. He has worked as a blogger for Discovery ID and served as a consultant for Jerry Brukheimer on “The Forgotten” and Dick Wolf on “Lost & Found”, two scripted series related to missing and unidentified persons.

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LINKS:

NamUs: National Missing and Unidentified Persons System http://www.namus.gov

University of North Texas Health Science Center’s Center for Human Identification/Forensic Science Unit  http://www.untfsu.com/index.html

Todd Matthews on UNT site: http://www.untfsu.com/Staff/ToddMatthews.html

Crime and Science Radio 2015 Interview With Todd Matthews https://crimeandscienceradio.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=615&action=edit

Billy’s Law http://lostnmissing.org/billys-law/

The Dead Unknown: Part 1 Mountain Jane Doe (Reveal Films)  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0vNQXsvrRU

 The Dead Unknown: Part 2 The Exhumation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tN4ZsjgUO-4
The Dead Unknown: Part 3 What Secrets Lie Beneath https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05KRjEqEcl8
The Dead Unknown: Part 4 She Always Had a Name https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRK7muHRXJ4
 
Mountain Jane Doe Identified https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hugiLiKi-RA
NY legislators want unidentified dead in federal database, Daily Freeman (from the Associated Press) July 6, 2016
 
“Who Killed Jane Doe #59? The Case of Reet Jurvetson – the fifth estate https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTyQhn1MjX8

Project EDAN http://www.untfsu.com/forensicArt.html

“Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains: The Nation’s Silent Mass Disaster,” NIJ report by Nancy Ritter. http://www.nij.gov/journals/256/pages/missing-persons.aspx

“Identifying Missing Persons and Unidentified Decedents” NIJ Website Law Enforcement topics http://nij.gov/topics/law-enforcement/investigations/missing-persons/Pages/welcome.aspx

The Doe Network: http://doenetwork.org

Black and Missing Foundatation  http://www.blackandmissinginc.com/cdad/

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children http://www.missingkids.com/home

PBS Frontline‘s “Post Mortem” series map of death investigation in the U.S. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/post-mortem/map-death-in-america/

“Uniform Protocol to Address Unidentified Human Remains and Missing Persons,” Marzena H. Mulawka, Ismail M. Sebetan, and Paul C. Stein, in The Journal of Forensic Identification, available through NCJRS https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=254866

“Resolving Missing and Unidentified Person Cases Using Today’s Technologies,” Dustin Driscoll, National Missing and Unidentified Persons (NamUs) Analyst, in The Police Chief Magazine, May 2013 http://www.policechiefmagazine.org/magazine/index.cfm?fuseaction=display_arch&article_id=2925&issue_id=52013

Unidentified remains: What’s known about some of the nameless dead (database); Cleveland Plain Dealer August 8, 2016http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/08/unidentified_remains_whats_kno.html

How Kathy Thornton solved her sister’s 39-year-old murder case; Miami Herald, November 23, 2016 http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/national/article116796023.html

Meet Iris, the FBI’s Only Electronic-Sniffing Dog: An Interview with Jeffrey Calandra

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Criminals and terrorists often hide data on electronic devices and then hide these devices. And they re often very clever about doing so. In such search situations, many subjects hide flash drives, hard drives, and other electronic components so if the police come, the instruments of their crimes may not be found. Take the example of a child pornography case where a subject will put pictures of innocent children on a thumb drive and hide it in the yard, behind walls, and all sorts of other places. In a normal search, a human investigator may not find the media.

What’s the FBI to do? Enter Iris, a young, eager, lab who is the FBI’s only canine capable of sniffing out these devices. And she’s one of only five in the world. How does she do it? How was she trained for such specialized work?

In this episode we talk with Jeffrey Chandra and he can tell us how all this accomplished, as well as how dogs are used in other criminal detection activities.

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BIO: Jeffrey Calandra possesses a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and a Masters in Criminal Justice with concentration in Computer Forensics. He spent 6-1/2 years as a special agent working child pornography, criminal computer intrusions, fraud, and bomb threat cases. HE has also assisted on Counter Intelligence, Counter-Terrorism, Drug, and Gang cases and has served as a member of the Hostage Negotiator team. He is currently a K9 handler for the FBI Electronic Scent Detection K9 Iris.

Iris, a 20 month-old black lab, is the first of her type in the FBI and one of 5 in the world. She will be the future of law enforcement. Already we are getting requests from across the country for her assistance. For a little background, Iris was trained as a seeing eye dog for a year and then was selected to be a law enforcement dog.

To Learn and Die in LA: Crime Scenes, Criminalistics, and the Cutting Edge in Los Angeles: An Interview with Former LASD Criminalist Professor Donald Johnson of CSULA

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This episode brought about a first for us. We recorded this program before a live audience — a meeting of the Southern California Chapter of Mystery Writers of America, at the Tam O’Shanter Restaurant.

Professor Johnson provided many insights on the work of those who scientifically examine crime scenes and the evidence gathered from them. He talked about changes in forensic science, new frontiers, and forensic science education. We know our listeners will love this episode!

ABOUT OUR GUEST:

Professor Donald James Johnson is an expert on criminalistics, with emphasis on crime scene investigation and reconstruction (homicides and sexual assaults), and forensic biology. His research interests include the application of new technologies to the field of criminalistics. He was formerly a senior criminalist at the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, where he was involved in the scientific investigation of violent crimes.

LINKS:
California Forensic Science Institute: http://www.calstatela.edu/hhs/cfsi
School of Criminal Justice and Criminalistics at CSULA: http://www.calstatela.edu/hhs/crim
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Scientific Services video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SboLJ7WwnXQ
Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department: http://sheriff.lacounty.gov
American Academy of Forensic Sciences http://www.aafs.org
 THANKS ALSO TO…

We’d like to thank Craig Faustus Buck, president of the So Cal Chapter of MWA, for his kind invitation to record a live program at a meeting, and Timothy Burke for his technical assistance.

The BTK Killer and Other Serial Murderers: An Interview with Psychologist and Author Dr. Katherine Ramsland

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Dr. Katherine Ramsland, director of the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice program at DeSales University, also teaches the forensic psychology track. She has published over 1,000 articles, stories, and reviews, and 59 books, including The Mind of a Murderer, The Forensic Science of CSI, Inside the Minds of Serial KillersThe Human Predator: A Historical Chronicle of Serial Murder and Forensic Investigation, The Ivy League Killer, and The Murder Game.

Her book Psychopath was a #1 bestseller on the Wall Street Journal’s list. With former FBI profiler Gregg McCrary, she co-authored a book on his cases, The Unknown Darkness: Profiling the Predators Among Us; with Dr. Henry C. Lee, The Real Life of a Forensic Scientist; and with Professor James E. Starrs, A Voice for the Dead. She presents workshops to law enforcement, psychologists, coroners, judges, and attorneys, and has consulted for several television series, including CSI and Bones.

She also writes a regular blog for Psychology Today called “Shadow-boxing” and consults for numerous crime documentary production companies.

Her most recent book (August 2016) is with serial killer Dennis Rader, called Confessions of a Serial Killer: The Untold Story of Dennis Rader, the BTK Killer. She will also publish The Ripper Letter, a supernatural thriller based on Jack the Ripper lore, and a textbook, Forensic Investigation: Methods from Experts (2017).

She talks to us about the experience of working with Rader, the conditions under which she took on the project, about the psychology of serial killers, and more.

LINKS:

Website: www.katherineramsland.com

Blog: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/shadow-boxing

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Kath.ramsland/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KatRamsland

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Forensic Science Then and Now: an Interview with Jay Jarvis

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Jay Jarvis is a native of Long Island, New York. While a student in high school, his chemistry class went on a tour of the New York City Police Crime Lab. It was on that trip that Jay decided that his interest in chemistry could be best used in the field of forensic science. After his family relocated to Georgia, Jay earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from Georgia College. To better prepare himself for a career in forensic science, Jay applied for and was accepted into the graduate program in Forensic Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and received his Master of Science degree in 1979. Immediately after graduate school, he was hired at the Georgia State Crime Laboratory in Atlanta.

During his 32-plus year career, Jay either performed casework in or was a supervisor for most of the forensic disciplines. Between 1982 and 1997, he wore a multitude of hats, performing casework in firearms and tool marks, hair, fiber and glass comparisons, footwear and tire tread examinations, fire debris and explosives analysis, latent fingerprint processing, marijuana identification, presumptive blood testing and crime scene analysis for a large area of central Georgia. He has testified as an expert in Federal Court and the courts of Georgia and several other states over 750 times.

Jay also has extensive experience in crime laboratory accreditation, having served as an accreditation assessor and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD/LAB), including one year as the Board Chair. He has been invited to speak at seminars and training sessions on topics related to forensic science. Jay currently lives in northwest Georgia just outside the metropolitan Atlanta area, which allows him easy access to most destinations via Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

 

 

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BOOKS:
Georgia’s Crime Doctor http://www.lulu.com/us/en/shop/jay-jarvis/georgias-crime-doctor/hardcover/product-10639368.html

LINKS:

National Commission on Forensic Science Recommendations on Accreditation https://www.justice.gov/ncfs/file/477851/download

“Real-Life Not Like CSI on Television,” Macon Telegraph article on Jay Jarvis http://www.armaforensics.com/uploads/Real_Life_CSI-Grisamore.pdf

“Alumnus carries microscope into career,” Georgia College Alumnus article on Jay Jarvis
http://www.armaforensics.com/uploads/Alumnus_carries_microscope.pdf

Arma Forensics www.armaforensics.com